Oregon Health Authority reports 9 more COVID-19 deaths, 391 new cases

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(Update: Wastewater monitoring data released for Bend, other cities)

Including 5 new cases in Deschutes County, 2 in Crook, 1 in Jefferson

PORTLAND, Ore. (KTVZ) — COVID-19 has claimed nine more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 664, along with 391 new cases, the Oregon Health Authority reported Tuesday.

OHA reported 391 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. Tuesday, bringing the state total to 42,808 cases, along with 794,187 negative test results.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported Tuesday are in the following counties: Baker (5), Benton (3), Clackamas (35), Clatsop (1), Columbia (3), Coos (5), Crook (2), Curry (1), Deschutes (5), Douglas (9), Harney (11), Jackson (25), Jefferson (1), Josephine (2), Klamath (5), Lake (1), Lane (31), Linn (6), Malheur (10), Marion (72), Multnomah (72), Polk (3), Umatilla (22), Union (1), Wallowa (2), Wasco (1), Washington (50), Wheeler (1), and Yamhill (6).

Crook County has had 110 COVID-19 cases, two deaths and 3,099 negative test results, OHA reported. Deschutes County has had 1,136 cases, 13 deaths and 38,151 negative test results. Jefferson County has had 605 cases, nine deaths and 5,586 negative test results.

St. Charles Health System reported seven COVID-19 patients as of 8:30 a.m. Tuesday, one of whom was in the ICU and on a ventilator.

Oregon’s 656th COVID-19 death is a 63-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on July 8 and died on Oct. 4 in her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 657th COVID-19 death is a 79-year-old woman in Wasco County who tested positive on Sept. 18 and died on Oct. 24 in her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 658th COVID-19 death is a 66-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct. 14 and died on Oct. 24 at Providence Portland Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 659th COVID-19 death is a 67-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct. 5 and died on Oct. 23 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 660th COVID-19 death is a 62-year-old man in Umatilla County who tested positive on Oct. 4 and died on Oct. 21 at Kadlec Regional Medical Center in Richland, Washington. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 661st COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct. 8 and died on Oct. 25 at Adventist Health Portland. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 662nd COVID-19 death is a 52-year-old man in Morrow County who tested positive on Aug. 25 and died on Oct. 24 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 663rd COVID-19 death is a 64-year-old man in Douglas County who tested positive on Sept. 25 and died on Oct. 25 at OHSU. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 664th COVID-19 death is a 66-year-old woman in Douglas County who tested positive on Oct. 18 and died on Oct. 24 at Mercy Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.


OHA releases COVID-19 Wastewater monitoring data

Today, OHA is beginning to display data related to its statewide COVID-19 wastewater monitoring project. The data shows where the virus is detected in small- to medium-sized communities around the state.

Currently there are 29 communities participating on the project. A map shows if COVID-19 is “detected” or “not detected” in a community. Bend is the only Central Oregon participant, and COVID-19 has been detected in wastewater in the recent monitoring.

It is important to note that if the virus was “not detected,” it does not mean that the community is free of COVID-19. Instead, it means that the virus may still be present in the area, but below detection levels.

The monitoring serves as an “early warning” system to tell us if COVID-19 is spreading silently in communities. It is meant to help public officials try to prevent potential outbreaks or, if necessary, move resources to a community. OHA launched the project in the early fall with funding from the CDC.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.



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