Euro Foods recalls salami products after tests show Salmonella contamination


Freeland, PA-based Euro Foods, has recalled 119,091 pounds of salami stick products that may be contaminated with Salmonella, according to USDA.

The USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) issued a public health alert for the “salame” stick products on Oct. 29, 2021, believing that the product was no longer in commerce. However, following this alert, FSIS observed products available at a retail location, and two Citterio “salame” stick samples previously collected by the California Department of Public Health had tested positive for Salmonella. The Italian-style salami stick items were produced prior to Oct. 25, 2021. The following products are subject to recall [view label]:

  • 2-oz. packages containing Citterio “Premium Italian-Style Salame Sticks ALL NATURAL” with “best by” dates through Jan. 23, 2022, located next to the barcode.

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. 4010” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to retail locations nationwide and exported to Bermuda.

FSIS has been working with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and state public health partners to investigate a multistate outbreak of 31 Salmonella I 4,[5],12:i:- illnesses in 10 states with onset dates ranging from Sept. 18, 2021, through Oct. 18, 2021. The epidemiologic and traceback investigation identified that ill people consumed Citterio Italian-style Salame Sticks produced by Euro Foods Inc.

Two unopened, intact, packages of “Citterio Italian-style Salame Sticks” collected by the California Department of Public Health as part of the ongoing investigation tested positive for Salmonella. Further testing is ongoing to determine if the product samples are related to the outbreak. FSIS continues to work with federal and state public health partners to determine if there are additional illnesses linked to these products.

About Salmonella
Food contaminated with Salmonella bacteria does not usually look, smell, or taste spoiled. Anyone can become sick with a Salmonella infection. Infants, children, seniors, and people with weakened immune systems are at higher risk of serious illness because their immune systems are fragile, according to the CDC.

Anyone who has eaten any recalled products and developed symptoms of Salmonella food poisoning should seek medical attention. Sick people should tell their doctors about the possible exposure to Salmonella bacteria because special tests are necessary to diagnose salmonellosis. Salmonella infection symptoms can mimic other illnesses, frequently leading to misdiagnosis.

Symptoms of Salmonella infection can include diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever within 12 to 72 hours after eating contaminated food. Otherwise, healthy adults are usually sick for four to seven days. In some cases, however, diarrhea may be so severe that patients require hospitalization.

Older adults, children, pregnant women, and people with weakened immune systems, such as cancer patients, are more likely to develop a severe illness and serious, sometimes life-threatening conditions. Some people get infected without getting sick or showing any symptoms. However, they may still spread the infections to others.

FSIS remains concerned that some recalled products may be in consumers’ pantries or refrigerators. Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on the FSIS website at www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.

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